Biss key

Biss Key-Learn A To Z About it From This Guide

Hey readers!

Today’s article is going to be a little bit techie, but don’t worry, I will make it easy for you to swallow it.

From the day you have installed an FTA dish, you might be hearing things like “this channel is paid” or something like “you need to enter its Biss key”.

But what the heck is Biss key?

In this article, I am going to tell you what exactly is Biss key and what it can do for you.

What is Biss key

Let me ask you a simple question.

If you want to protect your phone, what will you do?

Your answer must be something like that; you will set up some password or face lock.

The same thing is the Biss key.

Biss key is basically used to encrypt the satellite signals so only those people can get it who knows the Biss key. I hope you got the concept.

BISS stands for Basic Interoperable Scrambling System. It is developed by the European Broadcasting Union.

It is a 16-Digit alphanumeric code that is used to unlock TV channels.

Biss Control Words are static. They are only changed by the Broadcasters when they need to be.

There were times when most of the channels were encrypted by Biss Key. But now new and more advanced encryption has been introduced.

Types Of Biss Key

BISS-1 transmissions are encrypted by a 12 digit hexadecimal “session key.” Only the transmitting and receiving parties know the key prior to transmission.

This key forms part of the encryption of digital TV when the key is entered into both the encoder and decoder.

After entering the right key, the receiver decrypts the signals.

BISS-E (E for encrypted) is a variation where the decoder has stored one secret BISS-key entered by a rights holder.

This key is unknown to the user of the decoder. The user is then sent a 16-digit hexadecimal code, which is entered as a “session key.” This session key is then mathematically combined by the receiver to calculate a BISS-1 key that can decrypt the signal.

How Biss Key Works

A shared key is used by both the viewer and the broadcaster.

Broadcaster encrypts it with the encoder, and the viewer receives it and decrypts it with the decoder.

Enterprise version of BISS also exists where the broadcaster will encrypt the stream, and the system will send the content key by secret means to the decoders that are pre-registered with the BISS headend.

However, in BISS-E (BISS Encrypted) transmission, the key is unknown to the user of the receiver (decoder).

The user enters the 16 digits hexadecimal session key like 51 32 13 cc 9a dd ec cd.

This key mathematically combines by the receiver to calculate the BISS-1 key(BISS-1 key is 12 digit hexadecimal keyset by transmitting and receiving parties before transmission). After calculation, the BISS-E encrypted stream is decrypted.

How It Leaks

Usually viewers aren’t told Biss key.

But sometimes the hacker record and store the TS (transport stream) encrypted stream file.

They use CW finder software to penetrate into the recorded encrypted stream and analyze the key line.

This attack is a sort of brute force attack or hit n trial.

This way of cracking the key takes months, and the broadcaster changes the key frequently.

The solution is to make partition of the targeted length and crack it by teamwork. It will take a day or two to decrypt this way.

Where To Get Biss key

I post biss keys of the encrypted channels here, so keep visiting the site to be updated.

So that’s all for this post. I hope you got the concept of the Biss key. If you have any questions, then ask below.

Abdullah

Abdullah is a satellite enthusiast. He cures his enthusiasm by writing this blog.

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3 Comments

  1. hello sir, i commend you for your awsome work…
    i just wanted to find out whether BISS does work with terrestrial connection without having use satellite…THANK YOU???

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